Economy for All

economy for all

Economic activity has always involved meeting human needs through the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. Unfortunately, as economies evolved, they ended up rewarding the most powerful in society and depriving many of even the most basic requirements of life. We have come to the point today where many people believe that economic disparity is the natural order of things. However, people today are awakening. With higher levels of social consciousness and education, technological advances, and unimaginable access to information, we are realizing that there are more than enough resources on this planet for everyone and that our environment does not have to be sacrificed to achieve this. We can create an economic system that allows every human being, every living being, to survive and thrive—an economy for all.

Prout asserts that to remedy the defects of the existing economic order, the economy must be restructured in three fundamental ways. First, there needs to be a fair distribution of wealth so that everyone can afford to purchase their basic necessities as well as other goods and services for their personal development. Second, economic decentralization is essential for building local self-sufficiency and thereby creating ample employment opportunities in every community. Third, we need a new ownership structure that will balance individual and collective needs by cultivating more collaborative economic relationships.

Learn how these three systemic changes can help build an Economy for All

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